Staying Healthy for The Long Run

In your youth you may have been fortunate enough to receive the gift of good health. Now, perhaps you’re beginning to notice that your body is changing. Maybe you don’t have the stamina that you once had? Perhaps your mental clarity is lacking? Or maybe you would like to have a more youthful appearance? Here at T.J. Clark we understand the fundamentals of anti-aging from the inside out. Continue reading to learn how to optimize your nutrition and stay healthy for the long run.

The bottom line

Here’s the bottom line: age is a risk factor in many common diseases today including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer’s as well as many others. When it comes to slowing down the aging process, one method involves adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle. Although everyone is different and has their own individual needs, we believe that everyone can benefit from the information in this newsletter…

Anti-aging Nutritional Tips

    1. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables – Fruits and vegetables are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other antioxidants. Try to eat a wide variety of low glycemic fruits and vegetables. The USRDA recommends 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables per day.
    2. Take calcium and vitamin D – As you grow older, it’s important to get extra calcium and vitamin D in your daily diet. Why? Studies have shown that low estrogen in women and low testosterone in men are directly related to bone loss. 1 Our customers like to take our Liquid Calcium/Magnesium along with our Liquid Vitamin D. And some customers also take our Life Source staying young after 40 package as well.
    3. Eat less saturated fat – Eating less saturated fat and consuming more omega-3 fatty acids may help decrease the risk of developing many age related diseases such as heart disease and Alzheimer’s. Omega 3’s can be found in fish, flax seeds, and walnuts. We offer Catalyzed Fish Oil Capsules for those of you who do not like eating fish.
    4. Eat plenty of fiber – Be sure to eat plenty of plant foods that are high in fiber. Beans, nuts, seeds, fruits, and vegetables are great sources of fiber. Men and women need about 14 grams of fiber per 1000 calories according to the FDA. 2
    5. Drink plenty of pure water – It sounds simple enough, but your body needs water to keep it’s metabolism running efficiently. 3 Weather, alcoholic drinks, and various health conditions can contribute to dehydration. Water quality is very important as well. Most water, including many bottled waters, contains chemicals and hard minerals that you might not want. Filters do a poor job of removing all these contaminants. We recommend distilled water along with our Water Remineralization Formula.
    6. Eat quality protein – Be sure to eat at least 30 grams of protein for every 1000 calories. Protein is necessary for building muscles as well as many other metabolic functions. We prefer organic lean meats and small ocean caught fish as our protein sources.
    7. Dealing with decreased calories – As we age, our calorie intake naturally decreases. And some people are interested in cutting calories to lose weight. In both cases it becomes more difficult to get good nutrition. That is why many of our customers take our Phytobond Vitamin/Mineral Capsules or our Polyphytogenic Complete Mind/Body System for a little extra insurance.

In the end it’s important to pay extra attention to your body as you get older. Nutrition and lifestyle are both key when it comes to longevity. Use the tips above to maximize your knowledge and your health. We urge you to make changes slowly over time, noting the benefits of each one. If you have any doubts or questions about the list of suggestions above and how they might apply to you, please contact your licensed medical professional.


Sources

    1. What Causes Osteoporosis? And Why? Rebecca Buffum Taylor, Reviewed by: Brunilda Nazario, MD. WebMD.com.
      http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/living-with-osteoporosis-7/causes
    2. Fiber: How Much Do You Need? Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD. WebMD.com.
      http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/fiber-how-much-do-you-need
    3. Does Dehydration Slow Metabolism? Laura Niedziocha. Livestrong.com.
      http://www.livestrong.com/article/409152-does-dehydration-slow-metabolism/

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